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WPS Agenda: Resolution 2122(2013)



Resolution 2122 was passed on October 18, 2013 and focuses on women’s participation in conflict resolution and recovery from armed conflict. The resolution specifically calls for deeper commitment to women’s leadership and participation in conflict resolution and peacebuilding, and also acknowledges the range of humanitarian services, aid, and support for survivors of sexual violence in armed conflict.


The run up to Resolution 2122

The resolution is particularly significant for calling for a range of supportive services for women who face sexual violence in armed conflict – and is the first resolution to have supported access to abortion for women and girls who face rape in times of armed conflict. The resolution does not explicitly mention the word abortion but alludes to it by specifically “noting the need for access to the full range of sexual and reproductive health services, including regarding pregnancies resulting from rape, without discrimination.” This resolution followed two major initiatives by then United Nations’ Secretary General Ban Ki Moon in March and September 2013, in the form of recommendations to the Security Council that women and girls who face rape in armed conflict should be ensured access to “services for safe termination of pregnancies resulting from rape, without discrimination and in accordance with international human rights and humanitarian law.”


What does Resolution 2122 say?

Resolution 2122 specifically affirms the need for an “integrated approach” to sustainable peace, and sets out a range of concrete approaches to address the women's participation deficit in peace processes. It also acknowledges the need to address root causes of armed conflict and security risks faced by women, and calls for the provision of multisectoral services to women affected by conflict. The resolution also makes a clear connection between gender issues and disarmament, mentioning the arms trade treaty twice.

In sum, Resolution 2122 calls for:

  • Greater commitment on the part of states to pay more attention to women’s leadership and participation in conflict resolution and peacebuilding and improving the Council’s access to information on women, peace and security issues.

  • The recognition of the importance of humanitarian aid including the full range of medical, legal, psychosocial and livelihood services to women affected by armed conflict and the need for access to the full range of sexual and reproductive health services, “including regarding pregnancies resulting from rape, without discrimination.”

  • A firm emphasis on women’s participation in negotiating delegations, mediation support teams, peace talks, peacekeeping deployments, and electoral processes.

  • Continued efforts to address women’s access to justice in conflict and post-conflict settings.

  • A high-level review of progress on the implication of 1325 is scheduled for 2015. This Review is to be supported by a study by the Secretary-General.

States are encouraged to:

  • Develop dedicated funding mechanisms to support the work and enhance capacities of organizations that support women’s leadership development and full participation in decision-making, regarding the implementation of the Resolution 1325.

  • Increase the percentage of women military and police in the deployments to UN peacekeeping operations and to provide troops with adequate training to carry out their responsibilities (including on the prevention of sexual and gender-based violence).

  • Support the development and strengthening of the capacities of national institutions, in particular judicial and health systems, and of local civil society networks in order to provide sustainable assistance to women and girls affected by armed conflict and post-conflict situations.

  • Ensure women’s participation in efforts to combat and eradicate the illicit transfer and misuse of small arms and light weapons.

  • Review existing plans and targets regarding the implementation of Resolution 1325 and set new targets in time for the High-level Review scheduled for 2015.

References

A New Security Council Resolution (Read)

Shifting Focus in Resolution 2122 (Read)

UN Security Council Takes a Historic Stand Supporting Abortion Access for Women Raped in War (Read)


Engaging Further

Read the full resolution here.


Documented by Kirthi Jayakumar

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